Ham and Cheese Mini Quiche

Ham and Cheese Mini Quiche without crust -- A Pinch of Joy

 Ham and Cheese Mini Quiche without crust -- A Pinch of Joy

This crustless Ham and Cheese Mini Quiche is low on the carb scale – like 3 grams of carbs with 12 grams of protein.  Healthy enough for every day and deliciously handsome and tasty enough for company!

Ham and Cheese Mini Quiches work very well as a make ahead and freeze till needed dish.  Great for overnight guests!  Breakfast fit for royalty in a flash and no fuss.  Or thaw one or two overnight and warm in the microwave for a quick breakfast before work or heading off to school.  These cozy little quiches also make a nice dinner with a crisp salad on the side.

Nutmeg is frequently used in Swedish cooking particularly. And often for custard type dishes in other cuisines.  I’m always a little startled when I see it in a savory dish since I associate it with sweet desserts.  And my family is always startled by the taste. It dominates the savory for us so I tend to leave it out.  (And Wheels has some Swedish ancestry!)   Try it– you may like it. The Swiss cheese has a good, somewhat tangy, flavor, but if  available try substituting Guyere or even Havarti.   We love the taste of this.  I even like it cold the next day!   Or better,  with the refrigerator chill knocked off by 15 seconds in the microwave.

Prep time is relatively quick.  Unless you run out to the garden to get a couple of green onions and get sidetracked – ahem.  I use prediced ham which saves time.  Either buy the package of diced ham or make your own purchased on after holiday sale and diced, then frozen in 1 cup packages.

Baking time  really does depend on the size of the quiche.  The mixture gives a clear reading with the knife inserted in the middle.  When it is done, the knife comes out clean and won’t leave you guessing.  This time I used ramekins that held just over 2/3 cup of mixture ready for baking and had five quiches.  (Note: this will double the number of carbs and amount of protein in each serving.)  They took 18 minutes in my oven.   Standard muffin tins hold ½ cup in each opening, but since we are allowing for  rise of the mixture they are only filled about 2/3 full.  That’s between ¼ and 1/3 of a cup of quiche mixture.  Baking in a muffin tin will produce between 10 -12 quiches.  That’s eyeballing and not measuring what goes in each muffin cup – ‘cause who has time for that!  Sometimes my eyeball is working and everything evens out at 12 – other times it’s 11.

Ham and Cheese Mini Quiche
 
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Cook time
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Healthy enough for every day (low carb) and deliciously handsome and tasty enough for company (make ahead and freeze till needed)!
Author:
Recipe type: Breakfast
Serves: 12
Ingredients
  • 4 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 cup cottage cheese
  • ¼ cup milk
  • 2 tablespoons of flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon nutmeg, optional
  • ¼ teaspoon pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 ½ cup shredded Swiss cheese
  • ¾ cup diced ham
  • 3 tablespoons thinly sliced green onions
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375
  2. In large bowl combine the first seven ingredients, the fold in cheese,ham, and onion.
  3. Grease muffin pan OR spray with cooking spray. Fill each cup about ⅔ full of quiche mixture.
  4. Bake 15 to 20 minutes or until knife inserted in center of quiche comes out clean
  5. Cool 5 minutes before removing for removing from pan.
  6. To freeze: Bake and cool as above. Place in large resealable plastic freezer bag and freeze for up to three months. Before using, thaw in refrigerator overnight. Preheat oven to 350 and transfer into greased baking sheet. Bake for 10 to 14 minutes until heated
Nutrition Information
Serving size: 1 quiche Carbohydrates: 3 Protein: 12

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Balsamic Grilled Chicken

Balsamic Grilled Chicken -- A Pinch of Joy

Balsamic Grilled Chicken -- A Pinch of Joy

Grilled Balsamic Chicken can be prepared and frozen for serving at a later date – a great make ahead meal.  Or it can be made a few hours ahead of time and left to marinate in the refrigerator for an evening meal.  It has a little bit of balsamic tang to liven up the flavor of a nicely balanced mixture of herbs.  Leftovers (if there are any!) can be sliced, warm or cold,  atop a bed of salad greens for another meal.

In a time crunch?  Or missing one of the herbs?  You can substitute 2-3 teaspoons of Italian seasoning for the herbs.   Parsley, basil and oregano are basic in Italian seasoning.   Depending on the brand you will find a combination of other herbs so the flavor will be somewhat different.  But . . .   in a pinch that works!   Measure dried herbs    into your hand and crush them with the back of a spoon to release more flavor .

Do not substitute the vinegar, however.  Balsamic vinegar is made from grapes, not fermented, and put through a cooking process that darkens the juice through carmelization.  The liquid is called “must” and is aged before bottling.  The more complex and longer the aging process the  more expensive the vinegar.  It can only be produced in one area in Italy, using a specific type of grape.   Balsamic vinegars have a very distinct flavor.   The vinegars on the grocery shelf are generally what are called salad vinegars and fall into a different category than the aged Italian vinegars.  They may have another vinegar added and are also much less expensive.  While they may not be as flavorful as the “real deal” produced in a specific area of Italy and aged to perfection, they still have bring a very distinct flavor to your dish.

Grilled Balsamic Chicken can be prepared and then frozen for up to three months.  Great to have a make ahead meal in the freezer, ready to thaw and cook.  Or it can be made, marinated and grilled the same day.  If you can only find chicken breasts that are the big chunk of meat variety, slice them into  “fillets” about ½ inch thick.  This ensures that all the meat will take about the same time to cook evenly.   Do not overcook or the chicken will be tough and dry.  A thermometer will help prevent this.

Balsamic Grilled Chicken
 
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Tender grilled chicken with a little bit of balsamic tang to liven up the flavor of a nicely balanced mixture of herbs. Make ahead and freeze. Marinate and cook the same day. Place slices, warm or cold, on a bed of lettuce for a great salad.
Author:
Recipe type: Main
Serves: 4 servings
Ingredients
  • 4 chicken breasts cut about ½ thick (about 1 ½ pounds)
Marinade
  • ¾ cup balsamic vinegar
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon pepper
  • 1 tablespoon dried parsley
  • 1 ½ teaspoon dried basil
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
Instructions
  1. Combine marinade ingredients in large zip lock bag. Close and shake to combine.
  2. Add chicken and close bag again.
  3. To cook without freezing: Let chicken marinate for 2-3 hours turning occasionally.
  4. To freeze for cooking later: Insert bag with marinade and chicken into a second bag and close tightly. Label and place in freezer for up to three months. Thaw chicken and marinade in refrigerator for about 24 hours before cooking.
  5. Grill chicken over medium heat about 6-8 minutes per side until done OR 8 minutes in countertop grill (Foreman, etc) until cooked. Internal temperature will be 165 when done.
  6. Serve hot.

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How to Make a Boiled Omelet

1How to Make a Boiled Omelet -- A Pinch of Joy

Today’s post is a Bytes Bite,  written and photographed and the slide show created  by Bytes himself.  If you have a college student or a young professional looking for easy and healthy ideas for quick cooking and clean up, this fills the bill!  Bytes says:

When I’m cooking for myself I often go for a utilitarian approach.  Find the simplest things to cook, eat, and clean up. Something that can be prepped a few days in advance and be ready to cook in just a few moments is a bonus.  Something  I do every once in a while are Boiled Omelets.

I know a “boiled Omelette” sounds weird. But it’s the simplest way to explain how to make these omelettes.  It’s something that I also use for camping or feeding a large number of people who are wandering in to eat a few at a time. The advantages are numerous. For starters as long as there is water in the pot the eggs won’t burn so you can divide your attention between the stove and other things in the kitchen. It allows for mass production, and, if needed,  you can prep a bunch of baggies with eggs and milk ahead of time and people will be able to customize the fillers.  Note:  You can boil several omelets at one time if you use a large pot, which will save time.  Only put in as many omelets as will fit loosely across the pot in a single layer.

When I’m cooking for just myself, I go the other way. I will make up a few baggies with Omelet ingredients. They can sit for a few days in the fridge. All I have to do I add eggs and milk and they are ready to cook.

What you will need:

  • Zip sandwich bags.
  • A pot wide and deep enough for the bags to float in. A lid helps.
  • Tongs to pull the bags out, or to lower them in.
  • Eggs, milk, cheese, pre-cooked meat, veggies. Anything you might want in your omelette.

First fill baggies the cheese and meat and other desired ingredients.  About a 1/3 of a cup. Anything more than that you run the risk of making a mess. Use one bag per person and let them customize their choices if making for a group.  If making ahead to keep in the fridge, fill no more than five or six bags or about a week’s worth is easier to keep track of.

To cook Step one. Fill the pot with water, and start it heating. It needs to be at a rolling boil to cook everything.

Crack the eggs into the baggy. Then add a tablespoon of milk.  I often just eyeball the mount.

Seal the bag

Mix everything together in the bag. You just have to squish the bag and let it all slosh back and forth.

Double check the seal on the bag.  Then fold the bag over with the mix in the bottom.

Lower the baggy into the boiling water. And let it float.

Cooking time takes about 8-10 minutes.  When there are no runny eggs, it’s done.

Use the tongs to retrieve the baggy, peel and enjoy.

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I’m so glad you stopped by today!   Be sure to follow A Pinch of Joy so you don’t miss a thing!   Subscribe by email  on the sidebar  or follow on Facebook, RSS feed, bloglovin’  twitter  or   pinterest    If you found this helpful or inspiring please share below!  I’d love to have you along on this journey!

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